Dexcom Continuous Glucose Monitoring System

The Dexcom Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM) System educates, engages and helps members improve time in target range and reduce time spent hypoglycemic.1,2 CGM users have lower A1C, regardless of the insulin delivery method,1,3 making a strong case for prescribing Dexcom before insulin pump therapy.

Greater Glucose Awareness

The Dexcom CGM system delivers up to 288 readings every 24 hours, empowering patients by providing continuous data and feedback. On average, Dexcom CGM users check their screen 29 times per day.4

Informed Diabetes Management Decisions

CGM users adjust their insulin more frequently, and CGM rate of change (ROC) arrows were the dominant factor in insulin dose adjustment.5

Demonstrated Outcomes

CGM users across all ages have lower A1C.6 CGM use also lowers A1C and decreases risk of hypoglycemia.1

CGM Use Reduces A1C for Patients on Both Insulin Pump and Injection Therapy1

A "Gold Standard" of Care

Consensus statements from endocrine leaders point to the many benefits of continuous glucose monitoring in many patient populations.7-9

CGM Is a "Gold Standard"

In its recently published Clinical Practice Guidelines, the Endocrine Society calls out CGM as a “gold standard” of diabetes care for type 1 patients.10

CGM Lowers A1C Across the Board

Used in conjunction with intensive insulin therapy, CGM can be useful in helping lower A1C in diabetes patients of all ages – from children to adults over 25.7

More Patients Should Use CGM

The AACE calls for wider use of CGM in diabetes treatment, because it improves outcomes by reducing hypoglycemia. They go on to recommend CGM be used in all patients with severe hypoglycemia.9

1

Šoupal J, Petruželková L, Flekač M, et al. Comparison of Different Treatment Modalities for Type 1 Diabetes, Including Sensor-Augmented Insulin Regimens, in 52 Weeks of Follow-Up: A COMISAIR Study. Diabetes Technol Ther. 2016;18(9):532-538.

2

Beck RW, Riddlesworth T, Ruedy K, et al. Effect of continuous glucose monitoring on glycemic control in adults with type 1 diabetes using insulin injections: The diamond randomized clinical trial. JAMA. 2017;317(4):371-378. doi:10.1001/jama.2016.19975.

3

Battelino T, Phillip M, Bratina N, Nimri R, Oskarsson P, Bolinder J. Effect of continuous glucose monitoring on hypoglycemia in type 1 diabetes. Diabetes Care. 2011;34(4):795-800.

4

Dexcom internal data on file, 2016.

5

Pettus J, Edelman S. Use of Glucose Rate of Change Arrows to Adjust Insulin Therapy Among Individuals with Type 1 Diabetes Who Use Continuous Glucose Monitoring. Diabetes Technology & Therapeutics, Volume 18, Supplement 2, 2016.

6

Foster NC, Miller KM, Tamborlane WV, Bergenstal RM, Beck RW. Continuous Glucose Monitoring in Patients With Type 1 Diabetes Using Insulin Injections. Diabetes Care 2016;39:e81–e82.

7

American Diabetes Association. (2016). Glycemic Targets. Standards of Medical Care. Diabetes Care, S39-S40. 

8

Diabetes Technology—Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion Therapy and Continuous Glucose Monitoring in Adults: An Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline. The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. 2016:jc.2016-2534.

9

Fonseca V, Grunberger G, Anhalt H et al. CONTINUOUS GLUCOSE MONITORING: A CONSENSUS CONFERENCE OF THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS AND AMERICAN COLLEGE OF ENDOCRINOLOGY. Endocr Pract. 2016;22(8):1008-1021.

10

Experts Recommend Continuous Glucose Monitors for Adults with Type 1 Diabetes. 2016; https://www.endocrine.org/news-room/press-release-archives/2016/experts-recommend-continuous-glucose-monitors-for-adults-with-type-1-diabetes. Accessed February 14, 2017.